Browse Author: Денис Васильев

Denis Vasiliev: The Law on Controlled Foreign Companies. A Common Sense Approach

Denis Vasilev, attorney, partner at Podolsky, Vasiliev & Klein. More than 20 years of experience working with major Russian and international companies on issues of corporate structuring, taxation, real estate, as well as contract and financial law.

A lawyer’s advice to Russian subsidiaries of foreign companies, foreign managers in Russia, and Russian businesses and individuals with foreign accounts and companies.

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Denis Vasiliev: How to choose a corporate lawyer in Russia?

How do you choose a lawyer to represent your interests in court, prepare contracts, verify the purity of transactions, and ensure compliance? What do you do if you need a trusted, competent firm, but the services of the Big Four are too expensive? Any company with an interest in quality legal support at a reasonable price asks itself these questions. We asked Denis Vasilev, partner at Podolsky Vasiliev Klein, to help us answer them. Vasilev has spent more than 20 years working with major Russian and international companies on issues of corporate restructuring, taxation, contract law and court representation.

What advice will we receive from an expert who has deep inside knowledge of how the legal system functions?

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Storing Personal Data In Russia. Questions Without Answers

As this publication is going to print, a new law, which comes into force on the first of September, 2015, will mandate that the personal data (PD) of Russian citizens be stored only in Russia. Or maybe it doesn’t. Or maybe it does, but not only in Russia. Or maybe not stored. Let’s try to understand.

The law was passed unexpectedly. Further, it was approved not in a version that matches the opinion of Russia’s relevant agencies and its business community. According to some unofficial comments, the Act targeted major Internet companies, such as large social networks and search engines, who hold and own a vast array of information about Russia’s citizens. Initially the law’s purpose, as announced, sounded quite noble and necessary – to ensure that every citizen of Russia, in providing their personal data, would be able to demand the data’s deletion. To do this, every citizen must be able to call upon the controller of the personal data, and so this data should be in Russia and there should be a Russian address to which a request for deletion can be made. Continue Reading